Built from repurposed roofing tiles, this exhibition space is inspired by natural cave dwellings and tree canopies!

For Ngói Space, H&P Architects created full facades from tile scraps found on the streets of Vietnam and wrapped the city building in curtains of terracotta tiles to create a distinct look that uses light and shadows to challenge the spaciousness of conventional architecture. and to give the building a microclimate quality unique to its setting.

Architects have been inspired by natural homes for so long that they build their own. By taking advantage of the area’s surrounding landscape and nearby building materials, architects are better able to integrate nature and its organic structure into their designs. Vietnam-based architectural firm H&P Architects found inspiration in the natural canopies and layering of banyan fig trees, as well as the diverse and multi-layered rooms in caves for Ngói Space, a new exhibition center built from recycled tile construction waste.

The tile that Ngói Space constructs is well known in the cityscape of Vietnam as it is more commonly used on roofs in urban provinces. For Ngói Space, H&P Architects created full facades from tile scraps found on the streets of Vietnam and wrapped the city building in curtains of terracotta tiles to create a distinct look that uses light and shadows to challenge the spaciousness of conventional architecture. and to give the building a microclimate quality unique to its setting. A country known for its tile-work architecture, Vietnam’s crumbling tiled buildings are often demolished with little regard for the construction waste produced from the tiles.

While the tiles are familiar from the roofs and ceilings of Vietnam, H&P has given discarded tiles a new lease of life by using them to build facades. H&P Architects revived Vietnamese tile architecture and the building material itself, constructing Ngói Space’s frame entirely from concrete and wrapping it with 2,000 ‘viglacera dong anh tiles’ that created slanted facades. The building is formed from concrete castings and glass windows, which are wrapped in tile work facades to create a unique exterior display.

A rooftop provides an outdoor seating area where guests can enjoy their drinks or simply laze in the sun. The multi-storey building acts as a large communal space, with a different range of activities on each level. Moving through the cavernous halls cast in concrete, sunlight filters through the crisscross of tiled facades to brighten the industrial interior of the building. On the first floor, guests can congregate and enjoy coffee or tea, both indoors and out on the terrace, before moving up to the higher floors where seminar and exhibition spaces fill each floor. Then the roof provides a space for people to gather outside and enjoy the full width of the sunlight.

Terraces throughout the building can stay cool thanks to the microclimate quality created by the tiles. Speaking of the building’s repurposed tiling, H&P Architects notes: “The Ngói space was created as an inspiring solution for reusing these memory-filled tiles. On a larger scale, it orients users towards a sustainable future, from the perspective of harking back to the past to recognize and rediscover the core and hidden values ​​of the original space and use those values ​​to create spaces of the future.”

Designer: H&P Architects

The building’s concrete interior is inspired by natural caves to bring warmth to an otherwise industrial environment.

The triangles formed from recycled tiles offer plenty of views of the surroundings.

Sunlight filtering through the tiling creates mesmerizing light puzzles on the building’s ceilings and floors.

Interior walls are denser packed with tile to give a dense, fuller feel.

At night, the golden light that pours out Ngói Space helps it shine like a lantern in the dark.

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